Cosmetic Dentistry Blog Cosmetic and General Dentistry Questions Answered

August 1, 2016

Can broken-off teeth be restored?


We thank our advertisers who help fund this site.

Dr. Hall,
My husband has 2 front teeth that are broken off. The roots are intact. Other than a partial plate or a bridge is it possible to have root canals and caps?
– Jen from Ontario

Jen,

Yes, it may be possible to save a front tooth that is broken off, by doing a root canal, putting a post in that root canal, and putting a crown [cap] on the post, if there isn’t too much of the tooth broken off. It depends on the kind of bite your husband has. And it depends on the attitude of the dentist. Many dentists, I can tell you, may not want to attempt that. And recently, as dental implants have become more reliable and more popular, there may be less tendency of dentists to want to try to save teeth like this.

The mechanics of fixing a front tooth like this are tricky. A lot of dentists won’t realize that the main force working against them is a rotational force on the tooth. The front teeth are kind of roundish at the root. Then if the dentist puts a round post into the root, the resultant restoration doesn’t offer much resistance to rotational forces. Over time, then, those rotational forces can work the post loose. A way to brace against those rotational forces is to put two posts into the root.

Another problem that many dentists may not realize about this situation is that the post can end up cracking the root. There is a tendency to think that a rigid post would be stronger, and it may be stronger. But when tipping forces occur against the root, a rigid post will transfer those forces to deep inside the root where the tooth is thinner and they can crack the root. So flexible posts, such as carbon fiber or fiberglass posts should be used on front teeth.

Dr. Hall

Do you have a comment or a question or anything else to add? We’d love to hear from you. Enter your comment below.

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

November 30, 2012

How to treat a cracked tooth

Filed under: Fractured teeth — Tags: , , , , — mesasmiles @ 6:15 pm

I have cracked a tooth. It is on the bottom next to the back. An endodontist looked at it and suggested a crown. but was asked by my regular dentist to take out the filling to see how deep the crack was.This was not done.So my dentist tried to mend the crack.I cannot stand pressure on one side of tooth and it did not work. Since one side of tooth feels strong we are now considering an onlay. Do you feel a cracked tooth can be mended like this? Or should I go with the crown. I hated drilling away so much of my tooth that was not damaged.
– Pamela from Kentucky

Pamela,

I’m not going to be able to give you a certain answer to your particular situation. There are many degrees of cracks in teeth, from a superficial crack that is just in the enamel, to a deep crack that goes all the way into the dentin and could even involve the pulp of the tooth. And there are different places a tooth could be cracked. The crack could be horizontal, involving a cusp or a corner of the tooth, or it could be vertical, down the middle.

And to be clear, here, we’re talking about cracks and not fractures. If the pieces of a tooth move independently, then the tooth is fractured. The idea of treating a cracked tooth is to keep it from fracturing.

And there are different kinds of onlays. Some would work well for any type of crack and some would have restrictions.

An onlay covers all or most of the chewing surface of a tooth. It is a very nice restoration. It is hard to do, so a lot of dentists don’t do them. Since it doesn’t go down below the gumline except between the teeth, it is very gentle to the gums and helps promote good gum health. They can be made out of gold, porcelain, or hardened composite.

A gold onlay covering the entire chewing surface of a tooth would completely protect any type of cracked tooth. I would feel very comfortable with that. If the onlay is made of porcelain, I would only use it to protect the tooth in the case of a minor crack – either a superficial crack or a horizontal crack involving just a cusp or a corner of the tooth. The porcelain is not strong enough to hold a tooth together that has a serious vertical crack. Some supposed experts teach that the bonding strength of porcelain to the tooth is strong enough for this situation, and I believed that at one time, until I used an all-porcelain crown on a tooth that had a serious vertical crack. The porcelain crown and the tooth both ended up cracking all the way through, and I ended up repairing the situation at my own expense.

And hardened composite is considerably weaker than porcelain. I would not recommend that for any type of crack in a tooth.

This idea of repairing the crack with some other technique than a crown – no, that wouldn’t work. It might hold for a short period, but it’s not a long-term solution. Now if you were putting pressure on your dentist to find a more economical solution, then I understand. But if this was the dentist’s first choice of treatment, it makes me a little skeptical. I’m not sure what you’re meaning when you say that this treatment didn’t work, and I’m not following you when you talk about the pressure on one side of the tooth. I can’t visualize what you’re saying. And I don’t understand what that means, that a side of the tooth feels strong. So maybe your dentist is right. But I have this skepticism and would suggest a second opinion.

Dr. Hall

We thank our advertisers who help fund this site.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

October 16, 2010

Can you tell a cracked tooth from an x-ray?

Filed under: Fractured teeth — Tags: , , , — mesasmiles @ 9:58 pm

Is it easy for an x-ray to miss detecting a cracked tooth? I had full mouth x-rays-taken at two different dental offices within a month of each other. Neither set of x-rays detected a cracked tooth. But when I changed to another dental office and that dentist referred me to an Endodontist, from the x-rays the Endo took, he told me I had a cracked tooth that needed a root canal right away. I’m wondering why the other two dental offices missed seeing that cracked tooth in the x-rays, and am wondering if it is common for an x-ray and/or dentist to miss detecting a cracked tooth?
– Grace from California

Grace,
I would put the answer to your question this way – it is very difficult to detect a cracked tooth on an x-ray. Unless the x-ray is taken at the exact angle of the crack, it won’t show up.

I suspect that the endodontist didn’t actually see the crack, but saw some subtle evidence that suggested a crack.

I have four molars of my own that all ended up needing root canal treatments because of cracks developing in them. But none of the cracks have ever shown up on an x-ray.

Dr. Hall

We thank our advertisers who help fund this site.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

Powered by WordPress

Follow this blog

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.


Categories