Cosmetic Dentistry Blog Cosmetic and General Dentistry Questions Answered

September 21, 2018

Gap between my crown and my bridge


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I have a space between my 2 front teeth, however one of my front teeth is a crown and the other front tooth is part of a bridge. Can the gap between my front teeth be closed with Lumineers or any other procedure or would I have to get a new bridge and crown, possibly all in one structure to close the gap?
– Laura from Nevada

Laura,
Your question prompts me to ask a question of my own: Why did the dentist who made the crown and/or the bridge leave a gap between your front teeth? The easy way to fix this would have been to make them correctly in the first place.

At this point, yes, you pretty much need to have probably both of them re-made—depending on how big the gap is. Both front teeth need to be the same size—you don’t want to close the gap from just one side by making one side larger.

this microetcher has a long nozzle with a button on it, and at one end a small clear plastic bottle as a reservoir

A Micro-Etcher

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But there is a procedure you might want to try before doing that. There are ways to bond composite to porcelain, and you could start with trying that—treating this as a dental bonding case. If the dentist has what is called a micro-etcher, which is a small sand-blasting handpiece, he or she could micro-etch the porcelain surfaces next to the gap. This would be followed by etching with a hydrofluoric acid gel and then priming the surface with a silane coupling agent. A bonding resin would then be applied followed by composite bonding material to match the shade of the crown and the bridge. The composite would be shaped and polished. In theory, this should work. However, my experience with bonding to porcelain was that after a few months, we would see staining along the margin between the composite and the porcelain. But it could be worth a try to try to avoid the expense of a complete re-do of your front teeth.
I would think it goes without saying that you need an expert cosmetic dentist to do this, such as we recommend on this website.

The company that makes Lumineers, a few years ago, tried to promote the idea of bonding Lumineers over the top of porcelain crowns, but I strongly discourage that. You would get the same risk of staining at the margins, and would spend the same amount of money as you would spend just re-doing the case completely. Click the link to read more about the problems with that approach.

– Dr. Hall

Do you have a comment or anything else to add? We’d love to hear from you. Enter your comment below.

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

August 19, 2016

Can no-preparation porcelain veneers work for any patient?

Filed under: Ultra-thin Veneers — Tags: , — mesasmiles @ 8:19 am

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Dr. Hall,
At the bottom of your Lumineers section on your website, you have a photograph of Dr. Arnold’s patient who just had her braces taken off and wanted her teeth to look bigger.

Do you think this beautiful result was achieved because she had tiny teeth to begin with? Was that what enabled her to get away with a no prep and a non bulky result? Thereby making this less achievable to a patient with average-sized teeth. Realizing that he used his own ceramist to better control the result as well.

Thank you for your reply.
Wendy from California
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Wendy,
You are referring to a case done with another brand of ultra-thin veneers, not with Lumineers, that is posted at the bottom of our Lumineers page. I have posted the full-smile photographs below.

no-preparation porcelain veneers, before

Alexandra’s smile, before

no-preparation veneers, after

Alexandra, after no-preparation porcelain veneers

Yes, you are correct that a factor in the success of this case was that the teeth were a little on the small side to begin with. There has to be some care in case selection if the dentist is going to use a no-preparation technique. Not every porcelain veneer case is going to be a candidate for no-preparation veneers. Even with the veneers as thin as 0.3 mm, that is adding to the thickness of the teeth, and a little bit will be added to their length. If you look at the “after” photograph of Dr. Arnold’s case, you will see that the incisal edges of the upper front teeth are maybe a millimeter closer to her lower lip, so he lengthened those teeth about a millimeter.
Also, the teeth were straight. If a tooth is crooked, there will be a portion that will be sticking out, and that will have to be trimmed back in order to get a beautiful result.

And then Dr. Arnold, since he wasn’t using the Lumineers brand, was free to use his own master ceramist, Michael Morris, who is also very talented. I will repeat here what I have often said about the Lumineers brand. The company that makes Lumineers restricts their use to their own dental laboratory, which is why I don’t recommend Lumineers. I have yet to see a Lumineers case that has resulted in what I would call a beautiful smile. But this result by Dr. Arnold, as well as other cases I have seen, are truly beautiful. I have met Alexandra (this patient) in person, and even as a trained, accredited cosmetic dentist, I could not tell that she had anything but her own natural teeth showing in her smile.

Dr. Hall

Do you have a comment or a question or anything else to add? We’d love to hear from you. Enter your comment below.

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

June 13, 2016

Placing new Lumineers over old Lumineers


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Dear Dr Hall~
I have been reading all your expert information and advice about cosmetic dentistry and I am quite impressed. However, I noticed that you have not mentioned if it is possible to reapply new lumineers over existing lumineers. I have lumineers that just are not white at all and can never be whitened with any kind of bleaching due to the nature of the porcelain material. Would you recommend this “new over old” lumineer procedure and is it possible? My dentist is aware that I originally desired whiter lumineers but his tech said that was not available at that time. I do not want to insult him now because he is super nice but I feel there is no reason for “dingy” teeth in this day and age. Can you please respond with your thoughts? Thank you kindly.
– Gilda from Pennsylvania

Gilda,
Yes, you can do new Lumineers over old ones. But you wouldn’t want to, and I’ll explain why.

First, I noticed that you’re saying Lumineers without capitalizing it. Some people don’t realize that Lumineers is just one of many brands of porcelain veneers, so I wonder if you meant to refer to only the Lumineers brand. It’s the same answer whether you’re talking about Lumineers or another brand of porcelain veneers.

Lumineers are distinguished by the heavy marketing that has been done by the manufacturer. Back a few years ago, they were promoting among dentists this idea of putting Lumineers over old crowns, which is close to the same thing you’re suggesting. I think what happened is they ended up with a lot of patient complaints over how this turned out, and so I haven’t seen any of these ads for maybe five years now. Here is a photo of one of the ads in a print dental journal:

new Lumineers over old

Two main reasons you don’t want to do this.
First, it’s just as much work to put new porcelain veneers over old ones as it is to re-do the old ones. The dentist would have to prepare the old veneers some, at least, to have the final result be not too thick. So you’re going to pay the same as if the dentist just started over.

Second, the “new over old” technique wouldn’t last as long as brand new veneers and has a risk of looking funny. Bonding porcelain on top of porcelain doesn’t give as reliable a bond as bonding porcelain to a natural tooth. Even if the dentist did get a good bond, what happens if the underlying, original porcelain veneer fails? By adding another veneer on top, you’re doubling the chance of failure. It would be much better to have a brand new one.

And then the margin where the new porcelain meets the old tends to be more susceptible to staining than margin at the porcelain-to-enamel bond.

Another point about your question. Whiter Lumineers or porcelain veneers have been available since the time Lumineers were invented. Telling you that the whiter color wasn’t available at the time—that’s simply not true. I question whether or not this dentist or this tech is up to speed on cosmetic dentistry. Only about 1-2% of dentists are capable of doing a beautiful smile makeover. This team you have sound like they’re in that bottom 98%. I’d seriously consider looking for an expert cosmetic dentist if you want a better smile.

– Dr. Hall

Do you have a comment or a question or anything else to add? We’d love to hear from you. Enter your comment below.

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

September 30, 2015

How do you whiten porcelain crowns?

Filed under: Crowns for front teeth — Tags: , , — mesasmiles @ 5:09 am

 

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Dr. Hall,
I have several front teeth that have caps on them. I’ve had them for approximately 30 years. They are not white like I would like them. What would you recommend for whitening my “fake” teeth. I’m assuming they are porcelain, but not 100% sure on the material they’re made up of. They were put in with posts and each one is individual.
—Missy from Pennsylvania

Missy,
If you have caps (crowns) on your front teeth and they are white and they’ve been there for 30 years, I’m pretty sure they have to be porcelain. Nothing else would last that long.

Unfortunately, the only way to whiten crowns is to replace them.

There is a company that is promoting the use of porcelain veneers to cover over old crowns, but that procedure makes no sense for several reasons, one of the biggest of which is cost. With most dentists, the cost of a porcelain veneer is pretty much the same as a new porcelain crown, so why wouldn’t you just replace the crown? Even if the veneer is cheaper, it isn’t cheaper enough to make it worth it.

First of all, if these crowns are 30 years old, there is a decent chance there could be some leakage or even decay under them.

Second, pasting porcelain veneers over old crowns creates some problems. This is a tricky bonding situation, and the bonding between the old porcelain and new porcelain is hard to get very strong, and it tends to be susceptible to stain. And it’s not going to last all that long. If these first crowns have lasted 30 years, why not get new ones and try to get another 30 years out of them? That makes way more sense than bonding some veneers over them that might last another five years.

No, just replace the crowns. It’s time a dentist looked under them to see what is going on there. It’s bound to be at least stained. Have the dentist clean it all up and put on some beautiful all porcelain crowns that can be as white as you want them. Bleach the rest of your teeth first, and then get the new crowns.

But go to an excellent cosmetic dentist. This is a new smile you’re talking about, and you need a dentist/artist to do this right.

—Dr. Hall

Do you have a comment? We’d love to hear from you. Enter your comment below.

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

September 19, 2015

I have a bad feeling about how these Lumineers are going to turn out

 

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Dr. Hall,
My husband and I went to a local dentist who advertised cosmetic dentistry. We wanted Lumineers. Our teeth were prepped and impressions were taken. She told us the veneers would arrive in 2 weeks. Exactly 2 weeks later the dentist called and told us that the lab had called, there was a problem with the impressions, and that we needed to return to have the impressions redone. My question: is this common? We paid upfront so they have our money. Your thoughts will be so helpful as we are a bit anxious. Thank you so much.
—Didi from California

Didi,
I’m a little concerned over your situation.

That is not a big deal, to have the first impression not work out and to have to take another impression when you’re having laboratory work done. That happens in the best dental offices from time to time. And I’m confident you’ll get your Lumineers.

What concerns me about your case is what I’m reading between the lines. Admittedly, I’m doing a little guesswork, but this is informed guesswork. And I have some advice for you on how to handle this. It appears that you are dealing with a dentist who may not know what she is doing. I’m drawing this conclusion from the time delay in discovering that the first impressions were inadequate and that this information had to come from the lab.

Knowing what goes on behind the scenes with these things, here’s what appears to have happened. The dentist sent the case to the dental laboratory. The laboratory began working with them and realized that there was a fatal flaw in both impressions. They then called your dentist and told him that. Your dentist would likely resist, because this is embarrassing to have to tell a patient that they need to come back for new impressions, so the flaw must be serious enough to make the case unworkable. The problem is that the dentist didn’t recognize the problem herself, but had to be told. And it wasn’t just one of the cases, but both of them. Added to that is the fact that these are Lumineers, not another brand of porcelain veneers, and Lumineers tend to attract novice cosmetic dentists.

Here’s what I recommend that you do to protect yourselves. Insist that before the Lumineers are bonded to your teeth that they be placed with try-in paste. Insist on this. If your dentist doesn’t have any try-in paste, tell her to get some, because you need to have a good look at these on your teeth and be sure that you are happy with them. If you have any hesitation at all, backing out before they are bonded onto your teeth is comparatively simple. They can always be sent back to the lab to be re-worked or even re-made. And if your dentist can’t put them in with try-in paste, or if she can and you’re not happy with how they look, you can easily switch dentists if it’s before they’re bonded. By the dental code of ethics, enforced by the dental board, your dentist has to cooperate fully if you want to switch dentists, even if it is in the middle of a procedure like this. She would have to forward the models and Lumineers to another dentist. And if it comes to that, let me help you find an expert cosmetic dentist who will be sure that your case turns out looking good.

And don’t accept any excuses here. I have all kinds of stories in my files of patients who had try-ins like this and they didn’t like how they looked, and the dentist pressured them to having them bonded saying that once they got bonded permanently they would look better. Or they would look better in a couple of weeks. Or the patient would get used to them and learn to love them. Don’t buy any of these lines.

Try-in pastes for Lumineers or other brands of porcelain veneers are water-soluble gels that will hold the Lumineers on the teeth very loosely–not firmly enough so that you could wear them out of the office, but enough so that you could stand upright and look at yourself in a mirror. As I said, you and your husband need a good look at these before they’re bonded on, and if your dentist can’t do this for you, then you can find a dentist who can.

Now there are other possibilities for what has happened here. It’s possible that the impressions were damaged or lost after being sent to the lab. Or it could be something else. But I would still insist on the try-in based on this suspicion that we’re dealing with a novice. Excellent cosmetic dentists will all do this and if you have any hesitation about how the smile makeover looks, they will insist on fixing it before they are bonded on. Do a search on “beautiful smile guarantee,” and you’ll find the websites of a number of dentists we have advised about this and will learn how each of them has a variation of this same practice. They will try on the veneers before they’re bonded, and if you don’t love them, they will adjust them or even re-make them until you do and then bond them on. And maybe this is what your dentist was planning on doing all along. But if not, you still have a right to insist on this.

I hope this is helpful.
Dr. Hall

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

August 17, 2015

What do I think of 3N Veneers?

Dr. Hall
I have read many of your answers about the veneers available with interest. I have found them very useful.
I have a question about 3N veneers. Many practitioners in the Middle East refer to these as being better than Lumineers as they look more natural and less thick. I have checked on the net but I haven’t found 3N veneers in a dental clinic situated in UAE or Saudi ARabia. Could you please clarify this to me because they say they are used in Europe but I don’t know the name given to them here in Europe. Thank you in advance for your valuable tips.
– Asma from Brussels, Belgium

Dear Asma,
Thank you for your question about 3N Veneers and your information about their popularity in the Middle East. I had to look this up, as I hadn’t heard of them before. They have an attractive but very small website that doesn’t tell us a lot about them and all its information appears directed toward the prospective patient.

But how your 3N veneers, if you got them, would look would depend totally on the dentist doing them. Can 3N veneers look beautiful? It looks to me like they can, but they can also look ugly. Look at it this way: Do you think that there is anything about 3N Veneers that would prevent a dentist from making them too opaque and chalky-looking, too bulky, the wrong surface texture, or the wrong color? Of course not. As a patient, picking the porcelain would be like choosing the members of your country’s Olympic ski team based on the brand of skis they used. Or buying an oil painting based on the brand of brush the artist used. When you study art, do you categorize paintings based on the brand of brush or the brand of canvas? No, you categorize paintings based on the artist. Once you know the painting is a Picasso, or a Rembrandt, or some other artist, you know a lot about it and will have a rough idea of its value.

When actress Demi Moore got a smile makeover, I will guarantee you that she didn’t go and research brands of porcelain veneers. She asked around and found out who did beautiful cosmetic dentistry and went to that dentist and let the dentist pick the brand of porcelain.

And once you’ve found that dentist-artist you feel comfortable with, you don’t want to tell them what materials to use or what lab. They do their own research and will pick a lab and a porcelain that they are comfortable with. If you try to push them out of that comfort zone, you’re taking a chance.

Bottom line–I don’t see anything in what I can read about 3N Veneers that makes them special in any way. Yes, I don’t see the stark white and bulkiness that I see in Lumineers. But you don’t see that either in DURAthin veneers, or other brands of ultrathin veneers. And the problem in the appearance of Lumineers is mostly from the laboratory–only partly from the material.

– Dr. Hall

Read my page, Choose the cosmetic dentist, not the laboratory or the porcelain.

We thank our advertisers who help fund this site.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

August 14, 2015

My front teeth are darkening under my veneers

My Lumineers are 7-8 years old. Originally I had them on 16 teeth. At the time I had the money….there is no way I could afford this now. Soon after I had them put on by a dentist in Kona, Hawaii, I moved to Austin, Texas and they began to fall off. Two fell off and I paid to have them reinstalled. I told the dentist in Hawaii, and he ended up (after many letters and threats of legal action) sending me a very small refund so I could pay the dentist in Austin. The veneers had also begun to darken/no fit well at the gum line, making me self conscious more and more as time goes on. Since then no further veneers have fallen off, but over the past year I have noticed my front teeth darkening UNDER the veneers, one more than the other. I am afraid that I will need to have them removed and replaced and I definitely don’t have the money to do that. Interestingly, when I first chose the color of my new teeth I nearly chose a darker color to look more natural…as they seemed nearly too WHITE. But now they seem far darker…..I’m not flashing as white as my friends with natural teeth. Anyway….scared and disappointed I guess. Need advice on how to deal with the darkening teeth.
– Debbie from Texas

Debbie,
You’re right that the veneers will now need to be replaced. They are leaking, and the problem isn’t just the color, but when dental work leaks, the next step is that it begins to decay. When stain can leak in, bacteria also leak in.

It doesn’t sound to me like either dentist, the one in Hawaii or the one in Austin, knew enough to do this right. They weren’t bonded right in the first place, as you now understand. But very few dentists know how to re-bond porcelain veneers. The old bonding material would first need to be completely cleaned off, with some type of sand-blasting equipment which few dentists have. Then the inside surface of the porcelain should have been etched with hydrofluoric acid, again something that few dentists would stock. The veneer could then be primed and bonded onto your tooth, where it should remain without leaking for many years.

If your veneers could be just popped off, they could probably be cleaned up and re-bonded properly, and you should be fine. But I’m guessing that the Austin dentist probably bonded them on pretty well, just not well enough to hold up over these years. So they would most likely break in trying to take them off.

Another issue will be getting the new veneers to match your old ones. Make sure you go to an expert cosmetic dentist for this. Don’t look for cheap here–you’ll end up paying more in the long run.

I hope this is helpful.

Dr. Hall

We thank our advertisers who help fund this site.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

December 20, 2011

I have a HUGE tooth gap. What are my options? Not Lumineers, please!

Dr. Hall,
i wanted to know what would be the best way for me to take care of my problem. i have a really large gap in the front of my teeth. i have already seen a local dentist in flint because i wanted to get the snap on smile. i paid for the x rays and everything and the dentist sent everything in to the snap on smile company. then i get a call saying the snap on smile would not work in my case. i dont want to do braces so what do you feel is the best way for me? from what i can remember the last dentist said the size of the space between my teeth is 8mm to 10mm something like that. i have an appt to talk to another dentist about the lumineers to see if i could go that route. thank you for your time and i really hope you can save me some time and money and let me know what you think.
thanks again.
-Phyllis, from Flint, MI

Phyllis,
I’m glad you wrote to me because you are headed for disaster. Stop with this plan of doing Lumineers. This could end up looking hideous, and that’s not even the worst part. The really bad part is, if the only problem with the work is that you don’t like how it looks, you won’t have any recourse. So you could end up stuck with an atrocious smile.

A gap of 8-10 millimeters is huge. That is enough space to fit one more whole tooth in there. This is no job for the dentist on the corner. Here are your options:

1. You said you don’t want to do braces. By that do you mean traditional braces? What about Invisalign invisible braces? Do you know anything about that, and is there are reason you wouldn’t want that? With a gap this large, that would be my number 1 recommendation. The invisible braces are clear plastic pieces that snap over your teeth – no metal brackets, and no one can tell that you’re wearing them because they are thin and clear. It would probably take a year to close your gap.

2. If for some reason you don’t want to do that, you truly need an expert cosmetic dentist. If you go to a dentist who advertises for Lumineers, as a general rule those dentists are not very good cosmetic dentists. The Lumineers material does not have the best coloring, and their lab tends to make the teeth kind of long and extra thick, so most good cosmetic dentists stay away from that brand of porcelain veneers. But there are other brands that work well. Don’t pick the brand of porcelain – the important thing is to get a truly artistic cosmetic dentist who has a lot of experience doing smile makeovers and let them use the material they feel the most comfortable with. Depending on how your teeth line up, it may be possible to fill in the gap and re-shape the other teeth so that it looks natural. But this is difficult to do, so you have to have a dentist with a lot more expertise than your family dentist on the corner or a dentist who simply advertises that they do cosmetic dentistry.

I just did a quick check of dentists who advertise as cosmetic dentists in Flint, MI, and you’ll have to be really careful here. I did not find one right off the bat that I would trust with a job like this. If that’s the route you want to go, let me know, and we can try to find one for you. But it’s possible, in a city like Flint, that there really aren’t any good cosmetic dentists. But we can look. Otherwise, you may be interested in driving to the Detroit area. There are several good cosmetic dentists there. Let me know.

Good luck,
Dr. Hall

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About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

September 28, 2010

Ugly Porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.

Filed under: Crowns for front teeth — Tags: , , — mesasmiles @ 6:59 pm

Dr. Hall,
I had porcelain fused to metal crowns on my front top teeth over 20 years ago, and they now look terrible because you can see the dark line when I smile, and i have a very big smile. Is there anything that I can now do to change this? Would Lumineers work for me? Your advise would really be appreciated. thank you, Joan from New York

Joan,
What you need would be very simple for an expert and artistic cosmetic dentist, but I can’t emphasize strongly enough how important it is that it be an expert cosmetic dentist. Be sure you understand fully the difference between the dentist on the corner who says he or she does cosmetic dentistry and the dentist who is truly artistic, who knows how to create beautiful smiles. See our page, What is a cosmetic dentist?

You need new, all-ceramic crowns, with no metal in them. And this is a great opportunity for you, because if you do this right, you can have an absolutely gorgeous smile.

– Dr. Hall

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

October 21, 2009

My Opinion of DURAthin Veneers

Filed under: Ultra-thin Veneers — Tags: , , , — mesasmiles @ 5:46 pm

Today I have been looking at photographs of smile makeover cases done with DURAthin veneers. I must say that I’m impressed.

I’ve been critical on mynewsmile.com and in this blog of Lumineers. They are a brand of ultra-thin porcelain veneers, and I have yet to see a photograph of a Lumineers case that I felt showed beautiful cosmetic dentistry.

But all the photographs of DURAthin veneers that I examined today looked beautiful, and it caused me to wonder about the difference. DURAthin is also an ultra-thin porcelain, and is sometimes used in a no-prep situation.

The main difference, I believe, is in the laboratory work. Lumineers, because of trademark restrictions, have to be made in the DenMat laboratory, which is a large, commercial, impersonal dental lab. My opinion, and that of other cosmetic dentists I have spoken with, is that the DenMat lab produces mediocre esthetic results. DURAthin, however, allows any laboratory technician to use it, so a dentist can have his or her own master ceramist create the smile.

I think another difference is in the dentists they attract and the way the products are promoted. Lumineers are promoted to general dentists as being very easy to place and very lucrative. Consequently, they attract many dentists who really don’t know what they’re doing when they get into esthetics. Thus, I get many e-mails from their upset clients. DURAthin is taught almost as an elite technique, and the dentists that place them seem to be fairly sophisticated as far as esthetics. For example, Dr. Nils Olson, a mynewsmile.com recommended dentist who has been chosen as the new chairperson of accreditation in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, and thus could be considered at the pinnacle of excellence, uses DURAthin in his practice. Dentists like this will use a no-prep technique only when it can produce superior results. Otherwise, they will take advantage of the thinness of DURAthin by doing an ultra-conservative preparation, very possibly in enamel only, which may require no novocain and which could be likened to a mere dusting of the enamel surface.

Anyway, I’m soliciting more DURAthin photographs from our expert cosmetic dentists, and keeping an eye out, and will keep visitors to this blog and website posted.

We thank our advertisers who help fund this site.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

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