Cosmetic Dentistry Blog Cosmetic and General Dentistry Questions Answered

December 7, 2017

Can Supersmile remove stains on dental bonding?


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Dr. Hall,
Does the Supersmile accelerating kit work on bonded teeth?
How long does it take for Supersmile toothpaste take to remove stains?
– Bernadette from Connecticut

Bernadette,
A tube of Supersmile toothpaste, for removing stainsLet’s take your easier second question first—Supersmile toothpaste will remove surface stains on teeth with the first use. It has an ingredient, Calprox, that enzymatically dissolves the protein pellicle layer that covers your teeth, and stains will attach themselves to that pellicle. If the pellicle is removed, the stain is removed. When a hygienist cleans your teeth with a pumice abrasive, she is removing that pellicle, and that is what gives your teeth that super clean feeling.

The first question is a little more involved and requires making a couple of points.

First, you reference the Supersmile Accelerating Kit. This adds a whitening accelerator to the Supersmile toothpaste. It doesn’t improve its stain removal power, but it adds a whitening effect with peroxide to try to actually whiten the teeth. So if your concern is surface stains, I would stick with the less expensive regular Supersmile toothpaste.

Second, there are a number of possible ways dental bonding could stain, if that’s what you’re asking about. If the bonding is polished and the stain is on the surface, yes, Supersmile should remove those stains. On the other hand, if the bonding has lost its polish, that will make it attract stains and Supersmile won’t restore that polish. This is the reason I always recommended Supersmile for all my bonding patients, because many brands of toothpaste are too abrasive for dental bonding and will damage the polish. Supersmile, on the other hand, in spite of its powerful stain-fighting power, has very low abrasivity and will protect the surface of the bonding or porcelain veneers, or any other dental work. So if that is your case, I would have a qualified cosmetic dentist re-polish your bonding and then you can switch to Supersmile toothpaste to maintain that polish.

One more possibility for dental bonding being stained, and that is that it can absorb stain into the actual substance of the bonding. There is no way to remove that stain, and fixing this will require replacing, or at least re-surfacing the bonding with new material.

– Dr. Hall

Do you have a comment or a question or anything else to add? We’d love to hear from you. Enter your comment below.

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

September 11, 2017

Another dentist botches a tetracycline case


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Dr. Hall,
I had bonding done on my four front teeth almost 20 years ago to cover tetracycline stains. One chipped and I returned to my same general dentist to request veneers on the six front teeth as the solution. Instead, he talked me into six crowns, saying that they would last longer, serve as a better solution to the staining, and also help address my gummy smile. Foolishly, I listened without doing my homework, as I wanted the situation quickly corrected and he is a very reputable general dentist – not to mention a long-time family acquaintance. I trusted him. He is known as the best in the area.

Unfortunately, there is grey visible beneath a few of these luminescent crowns—and especially so in fluorescent light. I am horrified. He has said he will make it right and have the lab redo the problematic ones free of charge. However, I am now very concerned and thinking the better course of action might be to request a full refund and see a true cosmetic dentist. I think he is in over his head, despite trying to reassure me he does this work all the time.

I am now always going to be stuck with crowns versus my real teeth for the rest of my life and I am just sick about it. I think I would be justified in asking for a refund and entrust a re-do of the crowns to someone else. Your thoughts?
– Holly from Philadelphia

Holly,
This is tough, when you have a family acquaintance and supposedly reputable general dentist who seems to have little clue as to how difficult a procedure he has bitten off, probably with the best of intentions, but now you are suffering because of it.

Here is a list of his mistakes, all likely made with good intentions:
1. For lack of comfort with the porcelain veneers procedure, he recommended the highly aggressive porcelain crowns to fix your front teeth. And now that your teeth are ground down to stubs with crowns, there is no going back.
2. Based on the dental school mentality that there are six front teeth and the rest are back teeth, he tried to correct a very dark tetracycline-stained smile with fixing only six teeth. An excellent cosmetic dentist, in doing a smile makeover of dark teeth, will always include at least 8, maybe 10 or 12 teeth, depending on the width of the smile. Dental schools speak of anterior teeth and posterior teeth. Cosmetic dentists talk about the patient having 8 to 12 teeth in the “aesthetic zone.” Here’s a photograph of a patient with only six crowns on a background of dark teeth, but her smile is 10 teeth wide.

crowns on 6 anterior teeth, but the aesthetic zone is 10 teeth wide

The failure to cover all teeth in the aesthetic zone makes it obvious that this patient has crowns.

3. For lack of familiarity with the intense color issues involved in tetracycline stains, he didn’t adequately cover the teeth, and the dark color is showing through.

So should you let him go back and fix this now? Absolutely not. It’s likely that even his lab doesn’t know what they are doing. Tetracycline stains are one of the most difficult cosmetic dentistry procedures, and you need an experienced professional.

You’re in Philadelphia. We have several excellent cosmetic dentists in the area, in downtown, the suburbs, and nearby. Get your refund and move on. Done right, you could have a truly beautiful smile.

– Dr. Hall

Do you have a comment or a question or anything else to add? We’d love to hear from you. Enter your comment below.

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

September 4, 2017

Wanting a cheap way to fix tetracycline stains


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I have terrible Tetracycline stains and thinking about Veneers, I am curious if the they cover just the front of the tooth?
Also, I am 60 years old and really want a nice smile before I pass on, not wealthy at all. Are there any dental schools that do work with interns?
Thanks
Tony from Louisiana

Tony,
Porcelain veneers cover the fronts of the teeth, but in the case of tetracycline-stained teeth, they need to wrap around the teeth somewhat in order to completely cover the very dark stain of tetracycline.

As far as the cost, you are in for potentially serious trouble if you are looking for cut-rate porcelain veneers. Covering tetracycline stains is a very demanding cosmetic dentistry procedure and I wouldn’t consider going to any dentist who would charge less than about $1000-1200 per tooth for this. I would absolutely not go to a dental school for this. Dental schools exist to teach the fundamental techniques of dentistry, not the artistry, and they are so ingrained with an engineering mentality that most dental school professors actually look down their noses at cosmetic dentists and procedures that patients want just to enhance their appearance. Also, not only would your “intern” be doing his or her first tetracycline case, but likely the instructor would also.

If you want to save money, the best way to do that is to do nothing. Otherwise, I would simply save up and have this done right. Make a selection from among the best cosmetic dentists in your area. Check out my recommendations in Lousiana–I list several excellent cosmetic dentists there. You want a dentist who has done several tetracycline cases and can show you beautiful before-and-after photographs of his or her results. Otherwise, your first attempt at having this done would probably end up being throwaway money, and then you would have to swallow hard and pay the full price to have your teeth re-done right. I have a huge stack of emails from patients who have made the mistake you’re contemplating making.

Another option for saving money without risking the need for expensive corrective work would be Kör whitening. I believe that Kör is the strongest whitening system available, and while it doesn’t whiten as much as some dentists claim, it could lighten your stains considerably for a fraction of the cost of porcelain veneers and without the risk of needing later expensive corrective work.

– Dr. Hall

Do you have a comment or a question or anything else to add? We’d love to hear from you. Enter your comment below.

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

October 30, 2015

What are the different types of teeth stains?

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Dr. Hall,
Can you please explain endogenous vs exogenous stains? Intrinsic vs extrinsic stains? What terms would a dental assistant hear more and which should they be familiar with? I appreciate your help.
– Jennifer from Oklahoma

Jennifer,
This sounds like something that must have come up in connection with a textbook or a classroom discussion (I see your email address is from a college). That’s not the primary function of this blog, but your question is interesting and I’d like to help you out.

The terms you are using are those that would be used by academics and not so much by practicing cosmetic dentists. But they are a useful way to categorize teeth stains. Of the terms you mentioned, extrinsic and intrinsic would probably be heard more often clinically among practicing dentists than endogenous and exogenous.

Extrinsic stains would be those that exist on the surface of the teeth. Tobacco creates extrinsic stains. Here’s a picture of some teeth with extrinsic stains. extrinsic teeth stains

These are child’s teeth, and children, as their teeth are developing, tend to pick up some of these stains as different naturally-occuring bacteria come to populate their mouths. Peridex mouthwash causes this type of stain. The milder stains of this type can be removed by brushing (e.g. whitening toothpastes). The more stubborn ones will need to be removed by a dental cleaning, or by Supersmile toothpaste.

Intrinsic stains would be those that are absorbed into the actual structure of the teeth. They take a long time to develop. Years of drinking coffee or tea, smoking, or even eating highly pigmented fruits such as raspberries, will cause the teeth to darken. These stains tend to be brownish or yellowish. They cannot be removed by any toothpaste, but they can easily be removed by bleaching. Here are before-and-after photographs of teeth that had these accumulated stains which were treated with the Kör deep bleaching system.
intrinsic teeth stains, removed by bleaching

Exogenous stains would be those that are caused by outside agents. All of the stains mentioned above would be exogenous. All can be removed by either a surface cleaning of the teeth or by bleaching.

Endogenous stains are those that were acquired during the development of a tooth. Tetracycline stains would be in this category. If the antibiotic tetracycline is taken during the development of permanent teeth (between birth and twelve years old) it binds to the dentin of the tooth and becomes a deeply embedded stain. Fluorosis stains are more superficial but they are also developmental—they are caused by the consumption of too much fluoride while teeth are forming. From the point of view of a cosmetic dentist, you could also call a dark natural pigmentation in the teeth to be an endogenous stain. Some people’s teeth are just naturally dark.

The treatment of these endogenous stains is different. Tetracycline stains respond somewhat to bleaching, but are best treated by porcelain veneers. Fluorosis stains should not be treated by bleaching because they occur in splotches. However, the natural pigmentation of teeth can be treated effectively by bleaching. With persistent bleaching treatments, people can get their teeth whiter than they were when they first erupted into their mouths.

I hope this is helpful. Good luck in your schooling.

– Dr. Hall

Do you have a comment? We’d love to hear from you. Enter your comment below.

Click here to ask Dr. Hall a question of your own.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

January 23, 2013

What is this mysterious brown stain on my teeth?

Filed under: Tooth staining — Tags: , , , — mesasmiles @ 12:13 pm

Dr. Hall,
I appreciate your help. Last year I began getting mysterious brown staining on my teeth that my dentist cannot remove. He did not tell me it could be fluoride. A natural health practitioner told me it is from excess fluoride. I am 63 years old. I have not used fluoride toothpaste in years, but my township has fluoride added to the water. I have been drinking Poland Spring water which also has fluoride. I do not drink wine or coffee. Last year I started drinking a cup or two of green tea daily which I just found out has plenty of fluoride, so this must be what pushed me to fluoride overload and brown staining. I only drink plain water now. Do you know which bottled water brands do not contain fluoride? Which type of whole house water filtration system removes fluoride?

Which cosmetic dentists in New York City would you recommend for bonding? I have had some previous bonding in NJ and was not happy with the color matching.
– Linda in New Jersey

Linda,
Dental fluorosis is a mottling of the enamel caused by excessive intake of fluoride while teeth are forming. In its mild form it is manifest by white spots. When it is more severe the spotting or mottling can be brown.

Once your teeth are formed, they will not be stained by fluoride. So if this is a stain that is new, it has nothing to do with fluoride.

I’m a little puzzled by your statement that this is a stain that your dentist can’t remove. Once your teeth are fully formed, any stain that they pick up should be able to be removed. Let me explain the two different ways to do this, depending on the stain.

There are only two types of stain that you would be getting on your teeth at age 63. One type would be external staining – something that attaches itself to the surface of your teeth. Any stain of this character should be able to be polished off. Supersmile toothpaste also works very well for removing these types of stains. It enzymatically removes the protein pellicle on your teeth, and it is that pellicle to which the stains adhere.

The other type of stain would be internal staining. Your teeth can absorb pigments from food and drinks. Tea is an excellent source of this stain, and, from the clues you are giving me, that seems to be the top candidate for this stain. I would know better if I could see it myself. Internal stains get absorbed into the enamel of the teeth and can only be removed with bleaching. Internal staining would be manifested by a general darkening of the color of the teeth. External staining would probably concentrate around the gumline of the tooth and the spaces between the teeth and would be irregular in appearance. Internal staining would be evenly distributed throughout.

I would not recommend bonding for this type of staining, if that’s what you have. Bleaching works better, is much less expensive, and doesn’t require anything artificial to be attached to your teeth, so it will look nice perpetually. Bonding would also require an expert cosmetic dentist, which limits you to about 1-2% of dentists. Any of the expert cosmetic dentists we recommend on our site would do an excellent job with bonding. But you don’t need an expert cosmetic dentist for bleaching – many dentists can do that well.

If you do need bonding work, however, and you are in New Jersey, you shouldn’t need to go to New York. Dr. Allyson Hurley, in Bedminster, does a fine job with bonding. She is AACD accredited. Google her and you will find her website. Dr. Jeff Golub-Evans, in Manhattan, is internationally renowned for his bonding skills, and sees many fashion models and movie stars, if you need that level of care.

Dr. Hall

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About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

October 19, 2011

The cosmetic dentist we recommended did a beautiful job with my tetracycline stains

Thanks so much Dr. Hall. Yes, thanks to your website I selected a cosmetic dentist off your site in my area. He did a beautiful job. I had tetracycline staining and right now it does appear that it is covered. I keep worrying that it may still bleed through in time. Hopefully that isn’t the case.
– Monica from Maryland

Monica,
I guess if you’ve had these dark gray teeth all your life, it may be hard to believe that you finally, really have a beautiful smile, but I can assure you that the tetracycline stain is firmly attached to the dentin and will not move around and somehow surface again.

Tetracycline stains do require an expert cosmetic dentist to treat. When poorly trained or inexperienced “cosmetic dentists” try to cover these tetracycline stains, they make one of two mistakes. Either they make the porcelain veneers too translucent and the dark color of the stains shows through, or they make them too opaque and the smile ends up looking pasty and fake. I’m glad to hear that your smile has turned out beautiful.

We thank our advertisers who help fund this site.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

April 12, 2010

Solution for brown fluoride stains

Filed under: Tooth bonding,Tooth staining — Tags: , — mesasmiles @ 6:50 pm

Dr. Hall
My son has brown fluoride stains on his front teeth. We have had a local dentist bleach his teeth but the stains are still evident. She recommends veneers but I wonder what the difference in cost is between bonding and veneers? Also can you recommend a cosmetic dentist in Amarillo, TX. Amarillo is the closest city to our small hometown.
Doreen in Texas

Doreen,
Don’t have the dentist who did the bleaching do the veneers or the bonding. She doesn’t sound like she knows what she is doing. It sounds like you have figured that out.

Teeth bleaching doesn’t work for splotched teeth. I shake my head every time I hear one of these stories, that another dentist doesn’t know how to do this.

Depending on the extent of the stains (these fluoride stains are called fluorosis), yes, direct dental bonding may be the best thing – this would cover up the stains. And thank you for asking for our recommendation. But even Amarillo is a problem. I just looked there again and can’t find anyone I would recommend.
And, as I check a map, I see that you are clear out in a remote rural area of the Texas panhandle. I know it’s going to be a 4-5 hour trip, but if you want this done right, I would really suggest you go to Oklahoma City. Very few dentists are going to know how to do this right, and they tend to gravitate to larger cities. In Texas, they go to Dallas, Austin, San Antonio, Houston, and other parts of east and central texas. I have looked in West Texas and only last month did I finally find someone in Lubbock that I would refer patients to. And we can’t yet find anyone in Amarillo.

Dental bonding is an art. It has to be done freehand, and they simply don’t teach it in dental school. And dentists have to be passionate about appearance-related dentistry to know how to do it well and to stock the materials on hand to be able to do it right.

I would recommend Dr. Michael Forth in Edmond, OK. That’s a northern suburb of Oklahoma City. He does beautiful work.
Good luck,
Dr. Hall

Read more about stained teeth.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

March 29, 2010

Staining from PerioPlus Periodontal mouth rinse.

Filed under: Tooth staining,Uncategorized — mesasmiles @ 11:40 am

Hi Doctor Hall,
After 2 days of using Perioplus Maintenance rinse (after gum surgery), I’ve noticed some staining on my brand new dental work , constisting of crowns and bridgework. Is there anything I can do to bring the color back to the original? Help! Thank-you , Diane

Dear Diane,
I had to do a little research for this one, because I haven’t heard of this product before. And I confirmed my suspicions. They downplay it and don’t even mention it on the product label, but this product contains chlorhexidine. They call the label a “nutritional” label, and since chlorhexidine is an antibacterial agent and not a nutritional ingredient, I guess that makes it so they don’t have to disclose that.

This is not to be too critical – it’s just that I think they should mention that on the label. Chlorhexidine is an excellent anti-bacterial agent, and has been prescribed by periodontists and general dentists for years as Peridex. I had occasion to prescribe it a number of times. It attaches to the soft tissue and protein pellicle on the teeth and has a long-lasting antibacterial activity that very effectively fights gum infection and inflammation. But it has a nasty side-effect, which is brown staining on the teeth and dental work. That may be why they’re a little timid about admitting this.

There is an easy solution, and that is Supersmile toothpaste. Supersmile has an enzyme – calprox – that dissolves away the protein pellicle and as far as I am aware, is one of only two ways to eliminate and prevent this stain. An aggressive pumice polishing of the teeth by a dental hygienist, or Supersmile toothpaste – those are the two ways to deal with this stain. Whenever I gave a prescription of chlorhexidine rinse, I insisted that the patient purchase Supersmile, because that brown stain can become positively ugly.

You can buy Supersmile directly from the manufacturer (Robell products in New York City). Or we offer it for a discount on our website. We’ve dropped the price to where we just cover our costs, because it is such a unique toothpaste with unique benefits. It does get rid of this stain, when used on a daily basis, and it is also great for maintaining cosmetic dental work.

Thanks,
Dr. Hall

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About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

January 25, 2010

I have tetracycline stains and 20-year-old porcelain veneers.

Filed under: Porcelain veneers,Tooth staining — mesasmiles @ 4:06 pm

Dr. Hall,
I have porcelain veneers that have been on 20 years, just about the life expectancy that my dentist told me. I have noticed some changes in the past 6 months to a year. There seems to be more of a gap between the veneers where I am constantly catching whatever I eat. Also, it looks like I have a space developing between the top of the veneer and the gum line. Can these veneers be removed for new ones? 

My teeth were badly stained by tetracycline. I had tooth bonding done before all the great whitening treatments that are readily available today. I would have preferred that, although my dentist told me that the whitening treatments don’t really work on the type of staining I had.

So … can you let me know what the best route of refurbishing my old veneers would be. THX!
Nancy from New Jersey

Nancy,
Porcelain veneers can be touched up. They can be polished and the margins smoothed off.
But from what you’re telling me, it sounds like you may need a new set.

You say you have a space developing between the top of the veneer and the gumline. In other words, your gums are receding a little and exposing some of the tooth. And if you have tetracycline staining, this may be noticeable, depending on where your lip falls.
Teeth bleaching simply doesn’t work well for tetracycline staining. That stain is very stubborn, and even if you lighten the teeth, they never become sparkling and vital the way you would like.

But you absolutely need one of the best cosmetic dentists for replacing these veneers. I have heard stories like yours and they have the old bonding or old veneers replaced, and they look terrible. We have a number of New Jersey cosmetic dentists we recommend all over the state. I would strongly recommend that you consult with one of them. Only a small percentage of dentists who advertise that they do cosmetic dentistry have the skills necessary to produce a beautiful smile on top of tetracycline stains.

And even though the life expectancy of your porcelain veneers seems to be what your dentist predicted, there is a lot of variability in that life expectancy. From what you’re telling me, the problems you are having are from changes in your teeth, not from a deterioration of the veneers. They might last quite a bit longer if it weren’t for that.

I hope this is helpful.
Dr. Hall

Read more about how long porcelain veneers last.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

January 2, 2010

Daughter’s teeth are stained with fluorosis.

Filed under: Tooth staining — Tags: , — mesasmiles @ 9:52 pm

Dr. Hall, I’m writing about my 9 year old daughter. She has severe fluorosis stains on her teeth. Her bottom central and lateral incisors are extremely yellow (those are the only permanent bottom teeth she has so far). Her top central and lateral incisors are very blotchy, and one of them is jagged on the side. She currently has braces correcting the problems resulting from years of sucking her fingers. Her teeth have bothered her for some time. The only reason we put braces on now, instead of waiting for the 12 yr molars, is to give her more self-confidence with her smile. It also gives us a little more time to figure out how to correct the fluorosis.
Thanks, Carly from Arizona

Carly,
You say your daughter has severe fluorosis. When fluorosis is severe, you need to cover the stained teeth with porcelain veneers – cover all of the teeth that are part of her smile.

Fluorosis is caused by consuming too much fluoride while the teeth are forming. Much natural drinking water has some fluoride in it. There is some natural water that doesn’t have enough fluoride, which makes teeth more susceptible to decay. Communities where this occurs generally add fluoride to the drinking water to bring it to the optimal level of about one part per million. But some communities naturally have water that has too much fluoride, and then some of it needs to be removed. If it isn’t, drinking that water for extended periods while the teeth are forming can cause fluorosis. Or, where people are drinking their own untreated well water, this can occur. Fluorosis can also be caused by mistakenly consuming fluoride supplements when it isn’t needed or by swallowing too much fluoridated toothpaste.

Mild fluorosis causes spotting of the teeth, and the spots can be white or brown, depending on the severity. Often direct bonding can be used in these cases, which just covers the affected spots.

If the fluorosis spotting is extensive, then the teeth need to be covered more extensively, and porcelain veneers would be the treatment of choice.

If there is just a general yellowish color, but that color is even – not mottled – then I would try teeth bleaching first. If that is the case, you’re probably not dealing with fluorosis but some other cause of the staining.

Just be sure you go to a highly experienced and capable cosmetic dentist. This is beyond the ability of your family dentist. Beyond the technical ability and beyond his or her artistic understanding.

You’ll want to wait until the braces come off. And the dentist will need to know how to time the work. I don’t know how long the braces will be on, but when they come off it may be possible that her very front teeth still haven’t fully erupted. In that case, it may be best to do some direct bonding temporarily, or something else. There will be a lot of different ways to tackle the problem, and a lot will depend on her attitude toward the problem. Dentists who aren’t artistically sensitive just aren’t equipped to handle these self-image issues very well, but experienced cosmetic dentists are quite used to them.

There is no minimum age for porcelain veneers, as long as the dentist knows what he or she is doing, and properly factors in the degree of present and future tooth eruption and other factors. Children can also have teeth bleaching.

– Dr. Hall

Click here to find a cosmetic dentist, screened for training and artistic ability.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

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