Cosmetic Dentistry Blog Cosmetic and General Dentistry Questions Answered

September 3, 2015

Which costs less, DURAthin veneers or Lumineers?

Dr. Hall,

Dr. Hall, what is the price of Durathin verses Lumineers? I would like to know which one is less expensive. I like the picture of the Durathin much better.
– Sharon from Virginia

Dear Sharon,

I need to change how you think about porcelain veneers. They are not a commodity like a necklace that you would just go to a store and buy and it doesn’t matter what store you get it from. The actual cost of the porcelain I would guess is in the neighborhood of 1% of the cost that you pay as a patient. And I’m just guessing at that because even as a dentist ordering veneers from a lab, I never even thought of that. What you are paying for is the labor and the skill in taking that material and making it into a beautiful smile. Let’s take my guess of $10 as the value of the porcelain in a veneer. The laboratory technician (ceramist) will mark that up to maybe $100 to $300, depending on his level of skill, and that is what the dentist will pay. Then the dentist will mark that up again to $1000 to $2500 which will be the cost a patient will pay for a single veneer.
And how it looks depends much more on the skills of these people than on the material itself. The reason Lumineers don’t look very good is that, because of trademark restrictions, they have to be made in the Lumineers lab, and they’re not a good lab in my opinion. DURAthin and other brands can be made by a ceramist of the dentist’s own choice. With a highly artistic dentist and ceramist, you get a much more beautiful result.
Some dentists will charge very little for Lumineers–maybe around $500 to $700 apiece. I wouldn’t let any of those dentists anywhere near my front teeth. Some dentists will charge that same amount for other brands of porcelain veneers. Same story–stay away.
I would say that in Virginia, you should be able to get a quality smile makeover from one of our recommended cosmetic dentists for somewhere around $1000 to $1200 per tooth. And that would be with DURAthin veneers or some other brand of ultra-thin veneers, which seems to be what you want. Be very selective in who you go to. Remember than only 1-2% of dentists have the artistic skills and training necessary to create a beautiful smile makeover.

Dr. Hall

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About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

September 2, 2011

Why did my dentist put stain on my Lumineers?

Filed under: Lumineers — Tags: , — mesasmiles @ 11:59 am

Dr. Hall,
I recently had 10 lumineers put on my teeth. I had previously had 4 done ( probably not Lumineers) 20 years ago. The current doctor ordered with a stain on them to look natural. I specifically asked for a very white smile ( after in depth discussion). Once they were placed…I called back 2 days later to tell him I was not pleased with the color. He then drilled off the top layer to whiten. Now I have dull, dead looking teeth and they are mishapen. Is this not an absolute insult to the procedure? I am sick at the $13,000 I have spent. Was drilling really appropriate?
– Karen from Texas

Karen,
You’re not really asking me about what to do now, so I guess you’re figuring there isn’t really much you can do. However, you may be able to get something done if your Lumineers look bad enough. What you will need is help from another dentist to put pressure on this dentist to fully refund your money or partially refund it, so you can have it re-done. There is a chance your dentist might respond to that.

Here are some points to take away about your story.

First, you have maybe figured out already that you were at the wrong dentist. Fewer than 1 or 2% of dentists are artistic enough to do a beautiful smile makeover. And if you go to a dentist who advertises for Lumineers, your chances of getting an artistic dentist are actually not very good. In cosmetic dentistry circles, the Lumineers brand has a reputation of giving a “B” or a “C” smile at the very best, and good cosmetic dentists are looking for the “A” or even “A+” result.

Second, I can totally understand what this dentist was thinking when he ordered the stain. In dental school we were taught that you needed that natural stain in the teeth, and our instructors taught us never to do really white teeth or they would look fake. Well, once I was in private practice, I decided to listen more to my patients, and if they wanted really white teeth I did them. So your dentist was just doing as he was taught. But a true cosmetic dentist will listen more to the patient and try to meet your expectations and understands that we all like white teeth.

Sooner or later you’re going to want to have these teeth re-done, if they look as bad as it sounds like. When you do, please select from our list of cosmetic dentists. We have five in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, and all of them do beautiful work. That is why I have this website – to help people like you find excellent cosmetic dentistry care. You cannot rely on the dentist’s self-proclaimed expertise in cosmetic dentistry.

– Dr. Hall

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About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

May 21, 2011

Who does beautiful Lumineers?

Filed under: Lumineers — Tags: , , — mesasmiles @ 10:05 pm

Hi Dr. Hall, I am considering Lumineers. I am 27 and have had braces of which my second tooth on the left side has gapped again. In addition, I have bonding on my front teeth from a corner chip and general wear. My bite is good though.

I saw the pictures of Alexandra from Kentucky and this is the result I am looking for. I went through a Lumineer consultation and felt as though the pictures looked bulky and a bit too round. Is there someone in my area with the artistic touch to achieve the results from Alexandra’s picture?
– Nicole from Baltimore

Nicole,
I’m worried about your looking for Lumineers. Read the pages on this website carefully. Alexandra from Kentucky did not have Lumineers – she had a different brand of ultra-thin veneers. This is an important difference. In the years since Lumineers were introduced, I have not seen photographs of a single case that I thought was a beautiful result with Lumineers. There are DURAthin veneers and other brands of ultra-thin veneers that have produced beautiful results that I have seen. The public talks a lot about Lumineers because they advertise a lot, but the expert cosmetic dentists know that there are other brands that give a much nicer result.

And yes, you have a couple of excellent choices of cosmetic dentists in the Baltimore area with an artistic touch that will give you beautiful results like Alexandra’s.

I would advise you to not look for a dentist who advertises as a Lumineers dentist. The Lumineers commercials make them look attractive, but their are trademark restrictions when dentists use the Lumineers brand, and they have to use the Lumineers laboratory, and in my opinion and the opinion of other cosmetic dentists, they don’t do the greatest lab work.

Dr. Hall

Click here to ask the dentist a question.

We thank our advertisers who help fund this site.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

April 23, 2011

Unhappy with Lumineers

Just two days ago I took my daughter in to have some Lumineers put on, first four teeth on the top. Prior to this she had braces to fix her teeth, and close in as many spaces as they could. We were told that the Lumineers were the least invasive and would close the gaps and be better than using bonding to fill them in. When talking with the dentist earlier, we saw a picture of before and after from the Lumineer book and said that we wanted them to be more tapered and not square, similar to the picture. They said they would take care of it and let us know when they came in.

When I asked if we could see them first before going on they said yes, but the way they did this was not the way they said they would. She had them in her mouth with some kind of temp material and her mouth was pulled back with a rubber device that really was hard to tell what was going on, and I couldn’t get a good view of them. Earlier they said she could get up and walk around with them in different lights, but this never happened. He assured us that it would look better when they are put on permanently.

I realized right away how big they appeared compared to her other teeth and how bulky they looked. I asked if there was something they could do to taper them, but he said to live with it for a week and see how we feel. I approached this again, and said how big they looked in the front, but they kept telling us how perfect they were. I felt like we were in shock and didn’t know what to say.

So, at home we really could see that these did not fit her face or her other teeth. They were large, straight across and she seemed to be having trouble talking and closing her mouth. Bottom line is that we are very unhappy.

The next day she went to school and the poor girl got teased, horribly. The kids comments were, horse teeth, they look fake, and the nice kids would say, they are nice but too perfect and big.

I see now, after the fact, that you really do need a cosmetic dentist. He claims to do cosmetic work, but when I checked out further, he is a general dentist. I called today and they are going to tapper them more, and they should look a lot better. But now I’m afraid of what the integrity will be. We could try this, but I think we just want them off and be refunded, so we can see a cosmetic dentist. What do you think is our best approach so we can do this without legal matters? We paid by credit card and we are not going through the insurance.

Thanks,
Cindy – Not happy in Oregon

Cindy,
I think there is a decent chance you could get money back to get this fixed right, if you go about this the right way.

I don’t know this dentist you’re talking about, so I’m judging this by what you are telling me. But it certainly sounds like you are right, and you have a dentist there who simply lacks the passion for appearance-related dentistry that you need for a case like this. An excellent cosmetic dentist would have been able to predict that these teeth would end up looking bulky. That is what Lumineers do. Also, an excellent cosmetic dentist would never have rushed through the try-in process, and would not have pooh-poohed your concerns when you first expressed them. He would not have said they will look better when they are put on permanently, and would not have asked you to live with them for a week and then see how you feel. All of these are attempts to brush aside your dissatisfaction.

One of the fundamental differences between dentists who are “fixers” and not artists is that the artists are very sensitive to your opinion of the appearance of their work, and they will deal with even the slightest hint of dissatisfaction.

A problem in dealing with a patient’s dissatisfaction with the appearance of dental work is that the standard of care for dental work involves primarily the function of the work, so it is difficult to get restitution simply because you are unhappy with the appearance. But your complaint is more than just that you don’t like how it looks – you were deceived about how the process would work, and the biggest thing is that you must have told them you didn’t want them to be put on – because you told me that they tried to assuage your concerns by telling you they would look better once they were on permanently – which isn’t true. Plus the embarrassment suffered by your daughter is very real and very documentable.

You say you want to get this resolved without involving lawyers. To do this, however, you will be most effective if you tell them that is your intention, while letting them know that you understand the strength of your position if you actually were to go that route. Here’s how I would proceed.

First, I wouldn’t have them do any more work on this. Wherever you are in the process, stop right now. Not only will this help your case, but it is more fair to them. The less chair time they waste on this, the lower their costs are. Plus that way you are making the strongest statement about your dissatisfaction.

Second, I would be very clear about your dissatisfaction, that you were led on and that you were told things that weren’t true. I would also be clear about the embarrassment being suffered by your daughter. These are your bargaining chips.

Third, you need to enlist the help of another dentist who will be sympathetic and who will go to bat for you, and be the person who will get you the deal from this dentist. Dentists are very conscious of their reputations with other professionals, so the other dentist will be in a little better position than you are to get this done.

I would suggest going to a dentist from out of town, because they would be more likely to take your side on this issue. Find an excellent cosmetic dentist on our list, and go see them for an opinion, and ask what they would be willing to do to help you get a refund of this procedure,

Also, if you haven’t yet paid the credit card charge for this procedure, I would tell the dentist that you intend to lodge a complaint with the credit card company and refuse to pay that bill unless you get a refund. This gives you one more avenue of protection, because the credit card company may be persuaded to take your side in a dispute over the charge.

I wish you well. I feel for your daughter. School mates can be cruel.

Dr. Hall

 

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About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

February 4, 2011

An impending Lumineers disaster – mynewsmile.com to the rescue!

Filed under: Choosing a cosmetic dentist,Lumineers — mesasmiles @ 12:17 pm

Jason from California wrote to me two days ago saying that he was going to pay for fixing his nephew’s teeth, but his nephew wanted to do Lumineers, and he was worried about that. I warned him about Lumineers, about their limitations. He wrote back and said the following, and sent a photograph of his nephew, and I commented back. This is truly an impending Lumineers disaster. Hopefully we can help out here.

Dr. Hall,
You are amazing. Thanks so much for the quick response. I’m going to convince my nephew to see one of the dentists you recommend.

Also, I’m attaching a photo of my nephew so you may see his teeth.

The dentist wanting the $18,000 for eighteen Lumineers is… (name deleted).

Again, Dr. Hall, thank you very much for your guidance.
– Jason from California

crooked-teeth

Jason,
Thanks for sending that info – the photo and the name of the dentist he wants to see.

Red flags here all over the place.

His teeth definitely need work. What I told you before would apply to his case – it would be a choice between traditional porcelain veneers and Invisalign – assuming we are ruling out traditional orthodontics because of the time factor and the discomfort. Looking at his lower teeth, they could also use work, so what I said about just bleaching them may not work that well. But the idea of doing Lumineers on them isn’t too good of an idea, either. Depending on a bite analysis and the x-rays, you may want to do a combination of porcelain veneers on the upper, Invisalign on the lower, or some other variation.

This is absolutely NOT a case for Lumineers. The reason for doing Lumineers rather than traditional porcelain veneers is to avoid having to prepare the teeth. That technique may be okay for teeth that are maybe a little short, that are reasonably straight, that maybe have gaps between them. What he has is just the opposite. The lower teeth are crowded. The upper right canine is sticking out too far. There is no way to get a decent result with this with porcelain veneers without shaving off the parts of the teeth that are sticking out. If he is serious about an acting career, this could be one way to really kill that career – with a phony-looking smile that ends up changing the way he speaks and disrupting his speech. I have had e-mails from Lumineers patients who have ended up getting their upper lip caught on their teeth now, or have ended up with a lisp or dry mouth because the Lumineers have made the teeth too bulky and they end up getting in the way of their tongue or lips or make it so they can’t close their teeth all the way.

And it was very interesting looking at the website of this dentist your nephew wants to go to. This dentist, Dr. [blank], says he’s a member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. However, checking the AACD membership records, he has only been a member for one year, which indicates that he would like to know more about cosmetic dentistry, but doesn’t have a lot of training yet. His CV is lacking any indication of any serious post-graduate training in cosmetic dentistry so far. And then the smile gallery photographs illustrating Lumineers are mostly from the Lumineers brochure, and don’t illustrate his own work. I called his office to get the details on this. There are a couple of photos of his own work on the website, but the esthetic and functional quality of that work, in my opinion, is poor.

Your nephew could definitely benefit from some guidance here. He is about to be supremely disappointed if he goes through with this Lumineers idea with this dentist. This is not an easy case. You need a dentist with strong expertise in cosmetic dentistry and with integrity.
– Dr. Hall

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

February 3, 2011

The best way to fix my nephew’s smile

Last June, as a high school graduation gift for my nephew, I said I’d pay for his dental work. I assumed he would choose ortho because that’s really what he needs. Unfortunately, he feels ortho takes too long and he wants to have Lumineers which his dentist is saying will cost $18,000 for eighteen teeth. My nephew knows that they only last twenty years, but he wants a new smile now so he can pursue an acting career. What do I tell him? Thanks!!!
– Jason from California

Jason,
Thanks for writing. I think I can really help you out here.

Since you’re paying for this, I assume you have to approve how this is done. Since you’re older and more mature, I hope you’ll exercise your right to be a guiding hand here, because I worry that your nephew is going to do something short-sighted, waste your money, and waste his opportunity. When you’re old enough to have been scammed a few times, hopefully you become more cautious and more wise.

Lumineers are just one brand of porcelain veneers, and in the opinion of many cosmetic dentists, including me, they are of lower quality – meaning of lower esthetic quality – than most other brands.

I’m going to guess that his main problem is crooked teeth, because you’re saying he needs ortho.

There are two excellent options, and which one you buy for your nephew depends on the situation in his mouth.

And here are the two options:
One would be Invisalign invisible braces. Your nephew, as a recent high school graduate, will have all his permanent teeth erupted already, meaning that he could be a candidate for Invisalign. And a nice thing about Invisalign is he could be bleaching his teeth with the Invisalign aligners at the same time. He would avoid the uncomfortable brackets of traditional braces, and would be done in 6 to 12 months, instead of the 2 years that regular braces require.

The other option would be porcelain veneers. Lumineers are a brand of porcelain veneers, but I get a lot of complaints of people with Lumineers who find they are too bulky, the teeth look chalky and not real, and they make the teeth longer. And when they are done on the lower teeth, I have had complaints of people saying they can’t close their teeth normally after they are done. I would find an excellent cosmetic dentist to do this, and I would stay away from a regular family dentist. Only about 2% of dentists are artistic enough to do a beautiful smile makeover.

Porcelain veneers will make the teeth look straight without making them actually straight. So that has to be weighed in this decision. But it’s not accurate to say they will last 20 years. There is no set lifespan on them, and how long they last depends absolutely on how well they are taken care of. If they aren’t well cared for, they could get cavities around the edges or start staining, and they may only last 5-7 years. If they are cared for carefully, they could last longer than 20 years. Either way, though, they are a maintenance burden, and having the teeth straightened with Invisalign will be trouble-free for the rest of his life.

But porcelain veneers give straight teeth in just two appointments. To a young man, I can understand how even 6 to 12 months can seem too long to wait for results.

Another item I want to discuss is doing porcelain veneers on the lower teeth. Cosmetic dentists usually don’t do veneers on lower teeth. Usually, they can just be bleached, and the case will look beautiful, because lower teeth just don’t show much when you smile. So, since they’re spending your money, you may want to be in on that decision. That’s why it would help to go to a cosmetic dentist you know is respected and who will be honest with you.

If I were you, I would pick the dentist for your nephew and that way you know you’re spending your money wisely. I would have two suggestions. One would be Dr. Les Latner, a highly respected cosmetic dentist who also teaches at UCLA and has a practice right in Los Angeles. He will be more expensive per tooth than this other dentist, but I am worried that the other dentist is over-treating. So the final result may be considerably less. The other dentist would be Dr. Dell Goodrick in Santa Clarita. He has done beauty queens and is well known for his beautiful cosmetic dentistry. Both of these dentists are qualified in creating beautiful porcelain veneers, or in doing Invisalign, so they could give an excellent opinion to your nephew on the pros and cons of each choice as it relates to the condition of his mouth.

I hope this is helpful.
– Dr. Hall

Follow-up:
Jason wrote back, and I responded with an evaluation of the dentist his nephew was going to go to and comments on his nephew’s photograph. You’ll want to read this one. Check out my reply – warning about an impending Lumineers disaster.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

December 13, 2010

Should I get Lumineers or Porcelain Veneers?

Filed under: Choosing a cosmetic dentist,Lumineers — mesasmiles @ 8:10 am

Hi Dr. Hall, I have been meaning to get my teeth fixed for about a year now but I am still not sure as to which procedure to get done. I have irregular teeth two of my front teeth are badly shaped one is very thin and has a triangular shape and the other one pretty much looks like a broken tooth. I have been thinking about getting either lummineers or veneers but dont know which would be best. I have heard lummineers crack easily and i went to a cosmetic dentist and he recomended veneers beacuse my teeth are already worn down so they would not have to ground them down much but I am still not sure as to which would benefit me most in concerns to durability. This procedure is very expensive and I am still saving up for it so I want to spend my money wisely and not have to go back to fix more problems which would mean spending more money. If you can please advise me as to which of the two would be a better choice concerning not only the look but most important the durability and which in your opinion can give more problems. thank you.
– Joyce from Florida

Joyce,
I’m going to suggest that you change your frame of mind in “shopping” for a new smile. This isn’t a product like a pair of shoes that you buy and it doesn’t matter where you buy it. This is a work of art and you’re hiring an artist to create it for you. Let’s say a community group asked you to commission a painting for the lobby of a local concert hall. Would you start by picking out the brand of paint to be used and the type of brush? Of course not. But that’s how it sounds like you’re approaching this new smile.

Lumineers is simply one brand of porcelain veneers. So asking whether to get Lumineers or porcelain veneers is like asking whether you should buy a Chrysler or a car. Lumineers is one of many brands of porcelain veneers.

There is a very big difference from one dentist to the next on how well they do with smile makeovers. Some dentists are exquisitely talented at this and they attract movie stars and models who fly to see them from across the country. And then there are many dentists who have no concept of beauty, and I could show you the e-mails I have received from patients who are literally in tears because their “cosmetic dentistry” that they paid thousands of dollars for is ugly. Here’s the deal: dentists pick this field because they like to fix things. 98% of them have an engineering mentality, and they simply aren’t artistic.

Start by picking the cosmetic dentist. And you’re going to have to delve a little deeper than simply that the dentist claims to be a cosmetic dentist. The reason I operate this website is to help steer patients to dentists who are true artists and can do beautiful work. There are a number of dentists who are capable of doing beautiful cosmetic dentistry beyond the handful who treat the movie stars, and that’s the kind of dentists I list on this website. It’s about one out of every fifty dentists who is artistic enough to create a beautiful smile. And the whole reason for this website is that I try to teach people that, and then I research the dentists and ask for photos of their work and I tell the website visitors who those dentists are.

A word about the Lumineers brand. Many excellent cosmetic dentists refuse to do Lumineers. They are strong enough, but they tend to be somewhat opaque and pasty-looking. Plus, because they are a trademarked brand, the dentist has to send them to the Lumineers laboratory in Santa Maria, California, and many excellent cosmetic dentists feel that lab doesn’t produce truly beautiful results. So the best you can get with the Lumineers brand is maybe a “B” smile, even with a great cosmetic dentist. That might be good enough for you. But the little secret is that usually you can get an “A” smile for the same fee or maybe just a little more, like $1100 per tooth instead of $1000.

You said that you went to a cosmetic dentist. I’m wondering how you know that he is a cosmetic dentist. I hope you have more to go on than just that’s how the practice was advertised. You can’t count on that. Cosmetic dentistry is an unregulated field – you don’t need any special training to be able to announce yourself as a cosmetic dentist.

My advice is, before you spend all your money and then write me another e-mail a year from now asking what to do now that you hate your new smile – spend a little more time on this. Get a second opinion from one of the cosmetic dentists on our list. I’m guessing from your area code that Dr. Jose Abadin is probably closest to you, but there are others you could check out. Go to our Florida page, pick one you think you’d be comfortable with, and spend some time picking a great cosmetic dentist. If you do that, everything else will fall into place.

And about the durability – actually even that is mostly dependent on the dentist and the techniques used rather than the material. All porcelains are very hard, but they are somewhat brittle. They get their strength from bonding them to the tooth. When Lumineers crack, it is usually because they weren’t bonded properly.

Dr. Hall

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

September 3, 2010

Serious Lumineers Problems – I Can’t Stop Crying!

Filed under: Lumineers — mesasmiles @ 2:41 pm

I just had lumineers done on my top six teeth. A while ago I had some composite applied to my two front teeth to cover staining from previous bonding. I told this dentist that as a result, these two teeth were bulkier than my normal teeth and I felt we should correct for that. Also, both my insicors are very bulk and I had hope this would be correct as well. She told me that we would make impressions and that the people from lumineers would know excatly what to do. After four week, I went back for new impressions but this time she was given instruction to shave a little off of the side of the one front tooth. Then a new impression was done. I just went in yesterday for my case and I been crying ever since. My teeth look like horses teeth and don’t even fit my face. The before and after test pictures they took before all of the dosen’t even come close. I had to argue with then to shave the length as they know extended over my bottom lip which has never been the case. I have such a pronounced over bite now, the top teeth come to the middle top edge of my lower lip. The told me I would get used to the feeling and that the muscles in my upper lip would adjust? I want these removed and a refund but I do not know how to approach this. I have waiting so long for this! and hav e spent a tone of money. I can’t stop crying.
– Anna from Georgia

Anna,

You’re another in a long string of victims of general dentists who don’t know much about cosmetic dentistry but yet try to do smile makeovers.

My first clue was the naive comment by your dentist that, “The people from Lumineers would know exactly what to do.” Two comments about that. First, it is the dentist who is supposed to know what to do and is supposed to tell the laboratory what to do. Second, the Lumineers laboratory is not one of your excellent esthetic dental laboratories. They do NOT know exactly what to do.

But then you have a problem that legally, you don’t have a recourse if the Lumineers are functional. Cosmetic dentistry is not a legally distinct specialty, so it is judged by the standards of general dentistry. The overwhelming majority of dentists are not artistic, so the governing philosophy in the profession is that if the teeth are functional, they are okay. So you’re not going to get support for your complaints.

So, as far as I can tell, what you’re left with is to try to persuade this dentist to refund your money, with sweet talk, flattery, or whatever you can. Unless there is something gross that was done.

Do you have a photograph of your teeth that you can send me? If I can see anything wrong functionally with the teeth, there may be more you can do. Maybe a photograph of just the teeth and a photograph of your face with the teeth showing the mismatch you’re talking about.

Thanks,

Dr. Hall

Links: Lumineers problems.
And we just added a page to mynewsmile where we are soliciting Reviews of Lumineers.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

September 15, 2009

Thanks for your comments about Lumineers

Filed under: Lumineers,Thank yous — mesasmiles @ 8:07 pm

Dear Dr. Hall,

I just read your “Lumineers cost”article at  and also the “example” question and answer which pertains to this topic and I was so pleased to read it. I write dental websites, and because of my familiarity with the dental world I have long been aware that Lumineers are not the best option available. I prefer not to write about them in favorable terms, but it is sometimes required as part of my job. I was pleased to read this direct and honest representation of Lumineers. In writing for dental websites, I have seen innumerable before and after images of Lumineers and of truly custom porcelain veneers, and the difference is almost always highly noticeable. While I cannot write website articles that warn individuals against Lumineers in a professional sense, I was very pleased to see that someone else has. Your article came up 3rd when I Googled “Lumineers.”

Because of the nature of my work, I prefer not to make my name available and would appreciate your discretion regarding my email address. However, I wanted to thank you for representing Lumineers as an option, but one which may have more negative than positive aspects.

I am amused to read your “hate mail section” – to find that dentists who are not willing to undergo the training which will allow them to do really great dental work are disparaging toward your article and email, and see it only as confirmation of their lack of interest in their patients’ welfare. Sincerely, &tc.

“L”

Dear “L”,
Thanks for your kind comments.

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

July 12, 2009

How do I find a Lumineers expert?

Filed under: Choosing a cosmetic dentist,Lumineers — mesasmiles @ 8:12 pm

Hello Dr. Hall! How do I make sure my dentist is a trusted and/or certified “Lumineer expert” I can trust? $10,000 is a lot of money to spend and be unhappy with the result…
Thank you,
Roni from San Diego

Roni,
First, on how NOT to make sure your dentist is a Lumineers expert – don’t use the Lumineers website. Dentists get listed as certified for Lumineers by paying money to the company. That’s all there is to it. It’s all a branding and marketing thing.

Here’s what the Lumineers advertisements don’t tell you – the big secret. There is nothing really unique about Lumineers. It’s just a brand of porcelain veneers. Even though their company has a training program and “certifies” dentists, all they have to do is pay them money and attend their course. There is no test, and many of the dentists who get certified do lousy work. If you find an expert and artistic cosmetic dentist, they can do Lumineers or any other brand of porcelain veneers. And there are other brands of porcelain that are as thin as Lumineers and look more beautiful.

As far as how to find an artistic and expert cosmetic dentist, that is the whole purpose of this website – why it exists. Because cosmetic dentistry isn’t a legally distinct specialty, any dentist can claim to be a cosmetic dentist without any special training. The few who take the trouble to really learn the field well, those are the ones I seek out to list on their site. We don’t list every expert cosmetic dentist, but all the ones we list are truly expert, because of our screening process. So check out our Southern California cosmetic dentists and pick one, and you can’t go wrong.

– Dr. Hall

About David A. Hall

Dr. David Hall was one of the first 40 accredited cosmetic dentists in the world. He practiced cosmetic dentistry in Iowa, and in 1990 earned his accreditation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. He is now president of Infinity Dental Web, a company in Mesa, Arizona that does complete Internet marketing for dentists.

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